Statewide rolling COVID-19 positivity rate hits one month below 10%

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State reports another 101 deaths Saturday

By TIM KIRSININKAS
Capitol News Illinois
tkirsininkas@capitolnewsillinois.com

SPRINGFIELD – The statewide COVID-19 positivity rate was to 6.5 percent Saturday as the state reached one month since it had a seven-day rolling positivity rate above 10 percent.

The Illinois Department of Public Health reported an additional 6,717 confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, bringing the total number of cases in Illinois to 1,024,039 since the outset of the pandemic.

The graph shows the number of new confirmed COVID-19 cases reported each day by the Illinois Department of Public Health. (Credit: Jerry Nowicki of Capitol News Illinois)

Saturday’s seven-day rolling positivity rate was 8.3 percent, dropping from 8.5 percent the previous two days. That figure has not been above 10 percent since Dec. 8.

The graph shows the rolling, 7-day positivity rate for tests completed starting on June 1. Illinois Department of Public Health data was used to calculate the averages. (Credit: Jerry Nowicki of Capitol News Illinois)

IDPH reported an additional 101 COVID-19 deaths Saturday, bringing the state’s death toll to 17,494.

Saturday also marked the third straight day in which more than 100,000 tests were administered across the state, the most tests administered over a three-day span since Dec. 10-12.

The graph shows the number of COVID-19 tests completed each day (blue), next to the number of positive cases those tests yield (red), according to the Illinois Department of Public Health. (Credit: Jerry Nowicki of Capitol News Illinois)

IDPH reported that 3,589 individuals were hospitalized due to COVID-19 as of Friday. Of those, 742 patients were in intensive care units and 393 were on ventilators.

The graph shows the number of intensive care unit beds in use by COVID-19 patients, non-COVID patients and the availability rate of beds throughout the pandemic. (Credit: Jerry Nowicki of Capitol News Illinois)

This week, Gov. JB Pritzker announced that he would begin scaling back some Tier 3 mitigations as early as Jan. 15 for regions that are meeting state-mandated metrics.

The entire state has been under Tier 3 mitigations since Nov. 20 in order to slow the spread of COVID-19. The seven-day rolling average peaked at 13.2 percent Nov. 13.

The current mitigations prevent indoor service at bars and restaurants and require some buildings, such as casinos, museums, and movie theaters, to close temporarily. Indoor dining and drinking at restaurants and bars are also prohibited in Tier 2, while limited-capacity indoor dining is allowed in Tier 1.

Pritzker said that he planned to leave mitigations in place long enough to cover the potential incubation period of positive cases following the holidays.

According to IDPH, a region must experience a positivity rate below 12 percent for three consecutive days, have greater than 20 percent available intensive care unit and hospital bed availability, and declining COVID hospitalizations for 7 of the 10 days in order to be moved out of Tier 3 mitigations.

Currently, only two IDPH-designated regions are meeting requirements to reach Tier 2 mitigations – Region 2, which includes 20 counties in north-central Illinois, and Region 7, which includes south suburban Kankakee and Will counties.

The graph shows the number of hospital beds in use by COVID-19 patients, non-COVID patients and the availability rate of beds throughout the pandemic. (Credit: Jerry Nowicki of Capitol News Illinois)
The graph shows the number of ventilators in use by COVID-19 patients, non-COVID patients and the availability rate of ventilators throughout the pandemic. (Credit: Jerry Nowicki of Capitol News Illinois)

Capitol News Illinois is a nonprofit, nonpartisan news service covering state government and distributed to more than 400 newspapers statewide. It is funded primarily by the Illinois Press Foundation and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation.

 

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